November 2015


Carolina coach Ron Rivera sees a Dallas team on the verge of a run with Tony Romo back and trying to keep the Cowboys in the playoff picture. Cam Newton's team rallied from 3-8-1 to win four straight and qualify for the postseason. This time, Carolina is 10-0 for the first time in franchise history, making its Thanksgiving debut Thursday against the Cowboys (3-7).
The Washington Redskins could become the first NFL team to play two games in London in one season - in consecutive weeks, no less. The Redskins will face the Cincinnati Bengals on Oct. 30 at Wembley Stadium, the NFL announced Wednesday. Washington also could wind up facing the St. Louis Rams a week earlier at Twickenham Stadium, depending on the Redskins' finish in the NFC East this season.
The family of National Football League Hall of Fame member Frank Gifford revealed Wednesday the former New York Giants star was suffering from concussion-related brain disease before his death in August at the age of 84. A postmortem on Gifford, who died suddenly from natural causes on August 9 at his home in Connecticut, revealed evidence of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE), his family said. Gifford, who played in five NFL championships in the 1950s and 60s, became a beloved figure amongst US sports fans after turning to broadcasting following his career.
The family of Pro Football Hall of Famer Frank Gifford says signs of the degenerative disease chronic traumatic encephalopathy were found in his brain after his death. In a statement released through NBC News on Wednesday, the family said he had ''experienced firsthand'' symptoms associated with CTE but did not offer specifics. Gifford died of natural causes at his Connecticut home in August at age 84.
They are a couple of oft-repeated refrains in this latest mediocre season for the Washington Redskins: Why can't the team's offense run the ball? ''It's a one-game season for us,'' Gruden said after practice Wednesday. Back when these NFC East rivals met for the first time this season, in Week 3, the Redskins managed to gain only 88 yards on the ground, rookie running back Matt Jones lost a fumble, and they gave up seven catches and a TD apiece to Odell Beckham Jr. and Rueben Randle in a 32-21 loss to the Giants that wasn't really that close.
Two-time Pro Bowl defensive end Jason Pierre-Paul of the New York Giants didn't hesitate saying why he was thankful on the eve of Thanksgiving. Four months after losing his right index finger and mangling two other fingers in a July 4th fireworks accident, Pierre-Paul said Wednesday he was just happy to be alive. ''The situation I was in I could have died or whatever,'' Pierre-Paul said after the Giants (5-5) practiced for Sunday's game against the Redskins (4-6) in Washington.
By Steve Ginsburg WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The family of Frank Gifford said on Wednesday the late NFL Hall of Famer suffered from the degenerative brain disease CTE and that his brain had been donated to help researchers explore the link between football and traumatic head injuries. Gifford, an eight-time Pro Bowl selection for the New York Giants, died of natural causes in August at the age of 84. Gifford's' survivors, including his wife, "Today" show host Kathie Lee Gifford, said in a statement released by NBC that pathologists confirmed their suspicions that he was suffering from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive degenerative brain disease linked to repeated head trauma.
By Steve Ginsburg WASHINGTON, Nov 25 (Reuters) - The family of Frank Gifford said on Wednesday the late NFL Hall of Famer suffered from the degenerative brain disease CTE and that his brain had been donated to help researchers explore the link between football and traumatic head injuries. Gifford, an eight-time Pro Bowl selection for the New York Giants, died of natural causes in August at the age of 84. Gifford's' survivors, including his wife, "Today" show host Kathie Lee Gifford, said in a statement released by NBC that pathologists confirmed their suspicions that he was suffering from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a progressive degenerative brain disease linked to repeated head trauma.
The family of NFL Hall of Famer and longtime broadcaster Frank Gifford revealed on Wednesday that Gifford's brain showed he suffered from chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE). The legendary New York Giants running back/flanker died of natural causes in August at age 84. Gifford's family released the following statement: "After losing our beloved husband and father, Frank Gifford, we as a family made the difficult decision to have his brain studied in hopes of contributing to the advancement of medical research concerning the link between football and traumatic brain injury. "While Frank passed away from natural causes this past August at the age of 84, our suspicions that he was suffering from the debilitating effects of head trauma were confirmed when a team of pathologists recently diagnosed his condition as that of Chronic Traumatic Encephalopathy (CTE)—a progressive degenerative brain disease. "We decided to disclose our loved one's condition to honor Frank's legacy of promoting player safety dating back to his involvement in the formation of the NFL Players Association in the 1950s. His entire adult life Frank was a champion for others, but especially for those without the means or platform to have their voices heard. He was a man who loved the National Football League until the day he passed, and one who recognized that it was—and will continue to be—the players who elevated this sport to its singular stature in American society. "During the last years of his life Frank dedicated himself to understanding the recent revelations concerning the connection between repetitive head trauma and its associated cognitive and behavioral symptoms—which he experienced firsthand. We miss him every day, now more than ever, but find comfort in knowing that by disclosing his condition we might contribute positively to the ongoing conversation that needs to be had; that he might be an inspiration for others suffering with this disease that needs to be addressed in the present; and that we might be a small part of the solution to an urgent problem concerning anyone involved with football, at any level. "The Gifford family will continue to support the National Football League and its recent on-field rule changes and procedures to make the game Frank loved so dearly—and the players he advocated so tirelessly for—as safe as possible."  Gifford is one of the first players, if not the first, from the pre-Super Bowl era to have been diagnosed with CTE.  He was on the receiving end of a brutal hit from the Eagles' Chuck Bednarik during a November 1960 game, a hit that rendered him uncocious, flat on his back on the Yankee Stadium grass. Gifford would spend several days in the hospital, diagnosed with a "deep brain concussion" that not only meant the end of the 1960 season for him, but also kept him out the following year. Gifford returned to the Giants in 1962 and played three more seasons. While the statement isn't hard on the NFL, which has long dismissed the effects of concussions and brain trauma on players, the revelation that Gifford, one of the founders of the NFL Players' Association, could have a big impact going forward, partucularly as the statement says the issue "needs to be addressed." A recent study showed the brains of 87 of 91 formers players had CTE. NFL commissioner Roger Goodell released a statement on the Gifford findings on Wednesday afternoon: "Frank Gifford was a beloved member of the NFL family.  He exemplified everything good about our game throughout his 85 years of extraordinary accomplishments, both on and off the field.   "We appreciate the Gifford family's desire to help the medical community understand more about CTE, and we are grateful for their support of the league's efforts to improve safety in our game. At the NFL, we are supporting grants to NIH and Boston University as well as other independent efforts to research the effects of repetitive head trauma.    "But we are not waiting until science provides all of the answers. We are working now to improve the safety of our game. The NFL has made numerous rules changes to the game, all to enhance player health and safety at all levels of football.  These include 39 rule changes and better training and practice protocols that are yielding measurable results.   "This work will continue as the health and safety of our players remains our highest priority. We have more work to do — work that honors great men like Frank Gifford.?"

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